What’s The Difference Between Stereo And Mono [Audio Example]

Stereo And Mono

In games and on movie players you will find the option to change the audio channel between stereo and mono. With Online-Convert.com, you can change this for your video files as well, either on the website or using our API (check out the tutorial). But what does that even mean, stereo and mono? What’s the difference between the two. Can you even hear it?

Read more to find out what distinguishes stereo from mono. We also provide some graphics to understand the differences better and – the best part – an audio track that will actually show you the difference!

 

The Difference Between Stereo And Mono

The main difference between stereo and mono comes with the number of audio channels used in each. Think of sound as an acoustic signal that is send out by a source and transported using a channel. The destination is a speaker, which can be an actual speaker or a pair of headphones.

First, lets have a look at stereo and mono individually. However, for a quick comparison, you can jump to the summary.

 

Stereophonic Sounds

What we know as stereo is technically described as stereophonic sounds. In stereo, several channels are used to transport audio signals to a speaker and thus to a listener’s ears. Typically, stereo uses two channels, but it can use more. In the most common set up, one channel is transported to one speaker and the other channel to another speaker.

Consider the following graphic:


Here you can see the aforementioned usual set up for stereo sounds. There are two different sources that send their individual signal to one speaker each.

Thus, sounds that are transported entirely to the right speaker will appear to come from a listener’s right side. The signal does’t have to be transported to one speaker in it’s entirety though. Sound can be transported proportionally as well. Meaning that a small proportion of the sound can be transported to the right speaker while the rest is sent to the left one, creating a more 3-dimensional hearing experiences. Sounds that are equally transported to both speakers appear to come from the center.

This is all based on the typical set up of two sources of sound that are transported to two speakers. Instances like surround sound, for example, use even more speakers to further design where particular sounds are coming from.

Thus, stereo is used to create an impression of sounds coming from different directions, setting sounds in perspective to one another and the listener. This is especially useful in movies and audio plays to emerge the listener/viewer into the story. It is also used in music. For example, in some songs it might be that the guitar part is send to one speaker, while the bass is send to the other. When listening to music or plays out loud, this is often not very apparent. Headphone-users, however, are often very aware of stereophonic sounds. Removing one ear piece can reveal that a particular instrument or sound is only transported to your left or right ear.

 

Monaural Sounds

In mono, also known as monaural sounds, there is only one source for the audio. While mono sounds can also be transported to different speakers, the signal that is played will still be the same.

This is visualized in the following graphic:


Here, the sound comes from only one sound and even though it is transported to two different speakers, the content of the signal is always the same. When listening to music or other auditory pieces using headphones, you will thus not hear any difference when you remove one of the ear pieces. The whole play with localization of sound thus gets lost in monaural sounds.

 

Summary

Here’s a concise summary of what distinguishes stereophonic from monaural sounds:

Stereo Mono
Sources of Sound 2 or more 1
Number of Speakers 2 or more 1 or more
Sound Localization Yes No

 

Hear The Difference

Now that we talked so much about it, you surely want to hear the difference between stereo and audio. Then go right ahead! Grab a pair of headphones and check out the following audio clips (source):

This sound ambience uses stereophonic sounds. If you lift or remove one of your ear pieces, you will hear that the footsteps are only audible on the right side, while the sounds of a flying bee are only audible on the left.

This one is the example for monaural sounds. No matter which earpiece you remove or lift, you will always hear both the footsteps and the buzzing of a bee.


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All You Need To Know About Playlist & Project Files

Playlist
Image by http://bit.ly/24O1Wdx

On Online-Convert.com we have noticed that some users are facing difficulties when it comes to certain files. While conversion of audio and video files is a piece of cake for us, some files uploaded by our users can not me converted to MP3, MP4 or AVI.

This is especially confusing when the users are able to open their files and play the videos or music contained on their home computer. In most cases, the reason for this is easily explained. Instead of uploading audio or video files, we are presented with project or playlist files that do not contain actual video or audio data.

We want to shed some light on the topic, so if you are interested in what playlist and project files are, read on!

 

Playlist Files

Playlist files can contain links to both audio and video files, bundling them up in a collection. The files are plain text files that contain information about the location of the files contained in the list. Thus, the files do not contain the actual songs, movies or episodes, but the local pathname or URL that points to where the file is stored on the web or your hard drive.

In short, this means that these files do not contain actual video or audio data but only a list where to find those files.

 

Popular playlist files are:

  • M3U: Media Playlist File
  • PLS: Audio Playlist
  • WPL: Windows Media Player Playlist
  • XSPF: XML Shareable Playlist Format

 

 

Project Files

Project files are similar to playlist files in that they do not contain any actual audio or video data. This is where the similarities end though.

These files are used to save your work in progress when editing either music or video clips. The files contain references to the used audio and video files as well as information about used effects, transitions, subtitles, images, graphics, annotations and more.

 

Popular media project files include:

Audio Editing Projects Video Editing Projects
  • AUP: Audacity Project File
  • BAND: GarageBand Project File
  • LOGIC: Logic Pro Project File
  • FCP: Final Cut Project
  • IMOVIEPROJ: iMovie Project File
  • MOTN: MOTN
  • MSWMM: Microsoft Windows Movie Maker Project File
  • PPJ & PRPROJ: Adobe Premiere Pro Project Files
  • VEG: Vegas Video Project
  • VEP: AVS Video Editor Project File
  • VPJ: VideoPad Video Editor Project File
  • WLMP: Windows Live Movie Maker

 

Shortcut Files

Shortcut files are also similar to playlist files. They reference a track or song somewhere on your computer or on a physical CD. Thus,they also do not contain any audio data but point to the location of a file on a CD or hard drive. Without the file stored at the exact same location, no audio data can be accessed.

 

Some of the more popular shortcut files include:

  • ASX: Microsoft ASF Redirector File
  • CDA: CD Audio Track Shortcut

Does Bit Rate Matter? Test Yourself! [Audio Examples]

Bit Rate
Image by http://bit.ly/1lpxc2F

If you have looked into audio or video files a bit more in-depth, you surely stumbled over the term bit rate. When you are creating or converting video and audio files, the bit rate plays a crucial role when it comes to the audio quality of your respective voice recording, music piece, movie, or video clip. Thus, we at Online-Convert.com decided to wrap up some information that you should know about bit rate!

At the end of the article, you will also find two examples to listen to. Because, yes, bit rate does matter!

 

What Is Bit Rate?

Before we dive into the reasons why bit rate is important to consider when working with audio or video files, lets first have a look at what bit rate is.

Do not get confused as bit rate is a term used for general data transmission, e.g. in your internet connection, as well. It simply states how much data (bits) are transferred in a certain amount of time. This is also true for audio data contained in music, voice recording, or video files. However, what you should be interested in is what the bit rate affects in an audio file; namely quality.

It is comparable to the resolution of an image. The higher the bit rate, the better the quality of your audio or video file. For example, the sound of an MP3 file with a bit rate of 192 kbps will be much better and clearer as of a file that only uses 32 kbps. The image quality of a video is also dependent of the bit rate.

The reason of this is that more data is transmitted during playback when a higher bit rate was chosen. With a slower bit rate, naturally, less data is transferred. Thus, sound and image quality are reduced.

It is commonly measured using bits per second (bps), kilobits per second (kbps) or megabits per second (mbps).

 

Here, the rule of thumb is: The higher the bit rate the better the quality of an audio or video!

 

Can I Hear The Difference?

No we settled that the bit rate chosen changes the quality of our audio and video files. Yet, is this difference even noticeable? Can you hear the difference between different bit rates?

The simple answer is: yes; but when is something really easy? Of course the changes in quality are both audible and visible across different bit rates, however the difference between a low and high bit rate is naturally easier to find than between a high and even higher bit rate.

But listen to yourself! Below, you will find different MP3 files that were all converted to MP3 by the same method, but using a different bit rate.

 

Example: MP3

Here’s the audible proof that you can hear the difference in bit rate throughout an audio file.

We have taken a WAV file (find it here) and converted it to MP3 using an online MP3 converter.  During conversion, we applied no other changes than the bit rate. Play each file to see (or rather hear) if you can notice the difference.

32 kbps  192 kbps  320 kbps

The difference between the first and second track is striking. There was certainly a loss in quality when converting the original WAV file to a 32 kbps MP3. You surely wouldn’t want to listen to music with such a low bit rate.

Depending on the headphones or speakers you use, however, you will not hear a difference between the later two tracks. It seems like, quality-wise, recordings with 192 kbps sound just as good as 320 kbps. It is not only a matter of gear though, whether you hear the difference or not. Your ears may also play a role in this. Some people are unable to hear the difference in similar bit rates.

 

Which Bit Rate Should You Use?

So, does bit rate matter or not? When you listened to our examples, you can surely agree with us: yes, bit rate matters! The difference in quality, especially between low and high bit rates is undoubtedly there. However, you would have to be an audiophile with high end gear to hear differences in higher bit rates — or just naturally very good ears.

 

Thus, when ripping a CD or converting a lossless audio file to a lossy format, what bit rate should be used?

It’s assumed that 256 kbps is the most commonly used high-quality bit rate for audio files like MP3 or AAC. Lossless audio files usually have a bit rate between 400 and 1.411 kbps.

It differs quite a lot more when it comes to video files: YouTube allows for 6.8 mbps videos while 8 to 15 mbps are in the HDTV quality range. Videos on Blu-ray discs, for example, can have a maximum bit rate of 40 mbps.

 

For personal usage, there is another factor you should consider: file size. Take the three examples from above. If we compare the file size between these MP3 files we get the following results:

  • 32 kbps — 144 KB
  • 192 kbps — 848 KB
  • 320 kbps — 1.37 MB

As expected, the file size increases the higher the bit rate is. Quality surely comes with a price. What does that mean for the casual music lover? Find the perfect balance between quality and file size. If you don’t hear much of a difference between the 192 kbps and 320 kbps file, you can easily grab the smaller file and put it onto your MP3 player or phone.

Adding Media To Your PowerPoint & Keynote Presentation

PowerPoint
Image by ImagineCup http://bit.ly/1PBjRA0

Despite the stigma, PowerPoint, Keynote, or other slideshow presentations are still the number one go-to tool for public, educational, and business presentations. No matter if you are presenting on a large or smaller scale, presenting important graphs, keywords, and findings, using a slideshow program makes it easier for you to set up the presentation, and visually more appealing for your audience.

We are not here to tell you how to do or present your findings, but we can help you with a very valid question when it comes to Microsoft’s PowerPoint: What kind of media can I add to my PowerPoint and Keynote slides?

Adding Videos and Audio Files to PowerPoint

While images and graphs, tables and charts add great visual content to your slides, they do not cover the whole spectrum of possibilities. If a video can underline your point or show your findings, you should also present it in your slideshow. For this, you do not have to fiddle with pausing and closing your presentation to open a media player.

Likewise, you can add audio samples and recordings to your presentation without having to click around a lot and let your audience wait.

However, not all media files are supported by Microsoft’s PowerPoint or Apple’s Keynote programs. To get an overview, we have dived into the specifications of each program and gathered information about the files you can add to your presentation.

Video Files

Following, you will find a list of video files that are supported by Microsoft PowerPoint or Keynote for both Mac and iOS. However, some replaying problems may still occur if the video file is using an unsupported codec. Thus, make sure that you check the presentation beforehand whether the correctly implemented video file can indeed be replayed without problems.

PowerPoint Keynote
  • ASF
  • AVI
  • M4V
  • MOV
  • MP4
  • MPEG, MPG
  • SWF
  • WMV
  • DV, DIF
  • MOV
  • MP4
  • MPEG, MPG
  • QT
It’s recommended to use MP4 video files, using the h.264 video codec and the AAC audio codec. Generally, all formats natively supported by QuickTime can be used for implementation into Keynote presentation.

Audio Files

With regard to Audio files, the codecs used for encoding the audio file plays a role in proper playback as well. Make sure to use a widely used and supported codec, and audio playback in your presentation shouldn’t pose a problem.

PowerPoint Keynote
  • AIFF
  • AU
  • M4A
  • MID, MIDI
  • MP3
  • WAV
  • WMA
  • AIFF
  • M4A
  • MP3
  • WAV
It’s recommended to use M4A files that have been encoded using the AAC audio codec. Audio formats that are supported by QuickTime can, usually, be used in Keynote presentations.

Additional Information

The information above are valid for the programs of the following versions:

  • Microsoft PowerPoint 2013 & Powerpoint 2016
  • Keynote for Mac (6.0 and later) & Keynote for iOS (2.0 and later)

If you want ti implement a video or audio file that is not supported by either program, do not fret! You can still use a versatile online audio converter to convert your recording or other audio file into a supported format. Likewise, a video converter helps you to convert videos into a format you can implement into your presentation.

Files Supported By Your Wii U

Wii U
Original image by wiiu-spiele.com http://bit.ly/1USb0cl

Over the past two weeks, we have had a look at files and other media supported by some of the leading gaming consoles on the market; the PlayStation 4, PSP, and PS Vita and the Xbox One. Today, we shall have a look at the more “family friendly” gaming console from Nintendo, the Wii U. Lets find out which media files, discs, and streaming services are supported by the Nintendo console.

Discs and Games

Contrary to the Xbox One and PS4, the Wii U is able to support almost all already existing Wii games. Using the Wii menu on your new Wii U enables you to play the old games for the consoles predecessor, as well as downloaded WiiWare and saved game data. Even formerly created Mii’s can be transfered to the new console. This makes the Wii U the most backwards compatible console out of the three. Instead of the Wii U Game Pad, however, you have to use your Wii Remote to play the old games.

Unfortunately, and again contrary to the aforementioned gaming consoles, the Wii U does not play any kind of DVD, Blu-Ray, or audio CD.

In sum, the Wii U supports the following discs and games:

  • Wii U games
  • Wii games

Media Files

While the Nintendo console does have several ports for external devices, the USB storage and SD cards compatible with the Wii U do not allow you to watch media directly from one of these devices. Instead, they can be used to increase the internal storage of the console.

Thus, there is no real chance to plug in a USB stick to your Wii U and watch a movie or listen to music. While this limits the possibilities to watch things using your Wii U console, there is a neat way around this: streaming from your computer directly.
This can be achieved using software like Plex or Playon. After installing the program on your computer and specifying the folder(s) in which you store your media data, your Wii U is able to connect with the apps and play the movie, song, or display pictures via the console.

The downside to this is that you need to keep your computer running to use this service. However, this means there is no file format restriction bound to the Wii U and you can watch videos and pictures, or listen to music of any format supported by the app you are using.

Video on Demand

One way to watch the newest series and movies (and old ones, of course) without having to establish a large collection of DVDs and Blu-Rays at home, is to stream your favorite media online. The Wii U supports different VOD (Video On Demand) channels for this purpose. Keep in mind though, that for some of them an existing membership with the respective service is necessary.

  • Amazon Instant Video
  • Hulu Plus
  • Netflix
  • YouTube

Furthermore, it is possible to stream videos from a home DVR or the television onto the Wii U Game Pad.

Files Supported By Your PlayStation 4, PS Vita, and PSP

PS4
Image by Leon Terra http://bit.ly/1N6YhQp

As we have stated in our last week’s post about files supported by the Xbox One, we do not want to engage in the ongoing battle between console gamers. Whether you have a Xbox One or a PlayStation 4, we want to present to you the amount of information that you need. After covering the Xbox topic already, today we will have a look at games, discs, and file formats supported by the new generation of Sony’s PlayStation gaming consoles. Thus, we will have a look at the PS4 and PlayStation Vita, but also at the still beloved and often used PlayStation Portable (PSP).

PlayStation 4

Lets have a look at the big gaming console first. With regard to discs, the PS4 seems to be pretty limited when it comes to Backwards Compatibility. However, using the Gaikai Cloud streaming capability, games from various PlayStation generations can be played on the PS4 via emulation. However, the old hard discs and downloaded games from the PS1, PS2, and PS3 can not be played on the PS4.

Supported games and discs include:

  • Blu-ray discs (also in 3D)
  • DVDs (also in 3D)
  • PlayStation 4 discs
  • PlayStation 4 downloads
  • used PlayStation 4 games

When it comes to streaming services, the newest PlayStation generation supports the following services:

  • Amazon Instant Video
  • Crackle
  • Crunchyroll
  • Epix
  • Hulu Plus
  • IGN App
  • MLB.tv
  • Music Unlimited
  • NBA Game Time
  • Netflix
  • NFL Sunday
  • NHL
  • Redbox Instant
  • Video Unlimited
  • Vudu
  • YouTube
  • YuppTV

A feature of the PlayStation 4 is the PlayStation 4 Media Player. The player supports various audio, image, and video formats:

Audio

  • AAC
  • M4A
  • MP3

Image

  • BMP
  • JPEG
  • PNG

Video

  • AVCHD
  • AVI
  • M2TS
  • MKV
  • MP4

It is obvious that the list is not as exhaustive as the list of file formats supported by the Xbox One. However, if you want to listen to audio files like WMA, WAV, or AIFF, you can always use a reliable audio file converter to make them playable on your PS4. Same goes for video files with a MOV extension, for example. Convert them to a supported video file using a video converter.

PlayStation Vita & PlayStation Portable

The PS Vita is the newest handheld console from Sony, succeeding the PSP. Since those two are portable gaming consoles, it is not uncommon to also use them as mobile video and music playing devices. The following video, audio, and image files can be transferred to the PS Vita and PSP to be watches and played “on the go”:

PS Vita

Audio

  • MP3
  • MP4
  • WAV

Image

  • BMP
  • GIF
  • JPEG
  • MPO
  • PNG
  • TIFF

Video

  • MP4

PSP

Audio

  • MP3
  • MP4
  • WAVE
  • WMA

Image

  • BMP
  • GIF
  • JPEG
  • PNG
  • TIFF

Video

  • AVI
  • MP4

Files Supported By Xbox One

XBOX One
Image by Marco Verch http://bit.ly/1P36TsI

No, we will not engage in the ever going fight between console users. We do not state that the XBOX One is Better than the PS4, or vice versa. Instead, we will give all Xbox One users an interesting and informative overview of the discs, files, and streaming services that are supported by their console of choice.

Discs and Games

Contrary to the predecessor Xbox 360, the Xbox One has an in-build Blu-Ray drive, enabling the Xbox One users to watch Blu-Ray movies on their console.

Unfortunately, the Xbox One does not support Backwards Compatibility – at least not in the common way. Xbox and Xbox 360 game discs do not run on the newest generation console. However, using the Xbox Preview Program, certain games trigger the download of so-called compatible files. A list of which games are supported can be found here. You can also vote for new games to be supported here.

However, the following hard discs and games are supported by the Xbox One:

  • Blu-ray discs
  • Xbox One discs
  • Xbox One Downloads
  • Used Xbox One games

Media Files

Using the Xbox Media Player, a variety of audio and video files with different codecs can be viewed, played, and displayed on the Xbox One. The app supports these file formats:

Audio

  • 3GP
  • AAC
  • ADTS
  • MP3
  • WAV
  • WMA

Image

  • BMP
  • JPEG
  • GIF (with animation)
  • PNG
  • TIFF

Video

  • 3GP
  • 3GP2
  • ASF
  • AVI
  • H.264
  • M2TS
  • M-JPEG
  • MKV
  • MOV
  • MP4
  • WMV

While this list is rather big, there are still some formats that are not supported by the Xbox One Media Player. If you want to watch DSLR Raw image files, for example, you would have to convert them to a supported format like JPEG first. OPUS or iTunes music stored in AIFF need to be converted to MP3 or another supported audio format first. And for unsupported video files, there is still the possibility to convert them to supported video files.

Streaming Services

Streaming is the new and convenient way to watch your favorite programs. Thus, the Xbox One also supports various streaming services, especially video streaming services:

  • Amazon Instant Video
  • Crackle
  • Crunchyroll
  • Epix
  • ESPN
  • HBO Go
  • Hulu Plus
  • IGN
  • MLB.tv
  • Netflix
  • NHL
  • redbox instant
  • Twitch TV
  • Vimeo
  • Vudu
  • YouTube

The New Music Apps Worth Downloading Right Now

Image by bangdoll http://bit.ly/1JdKcm6
Image by bangdoll http://bit.ly/1JdKcm6

Ever since some of the top apps just disappeared, millions of users have been on the lookout for the next best thing. It depends a lot on what kind of music you like to listen to. If you are simply looking to download something from the big labels, then look up Rdio or Spotify. On the other hand, if you want to find independent and new musicians, you might want to check out Bandcamp or Soundcloud.

Here are the apps that make things a lot easier for you when it comes to finding the kind of music that you like.

Noise.Supply

This is a website powered by SoundCloud. You can find a song that you like on SoundCloud and use its URL in Noise Supply. You will hear the same song and then another one that is similar to it.

The design is really simple, the site is a product from the creators of DogeCoin and Jackson Palmer, the creator has planned on adding a bunch of features in the coming months.

Music Suggestions Ninja

The website is powered by YouTube and all you have to do is type in the name of an artist or a band and this tool will start making a playlist just for you, which will consist of Artists that the software thinks you might like.

QCast

This app is compatible with iOS, Android, and Chromecast. When you are left with the task of picking music for a social gathering, it is never easy, especially since everyone likes to hear different kinds of music. This app allows everyone at the party who has a Smartphone to add in tracks from Spotify or Google Play.

Songhop

Songhop is compatible with iOS and helps you discover the latest jams on your iPhone. It does not play the full versions of songs, just the short samples, which means it is less of a radio station and a lot like a music discovery service. You listen to several tracks and then make note of the ones you like in particular.

If you know how to use tinder, then this will be a lot easier for you, as the app makes use of the same tinder swipe system.

Spotifree

This is compatible with Windows and Mac. Spotify offers you ad supported and free version of their services. This means that you can listen to all the music you want to without any charge. Spotifree mutes spotify’s volumes while there are ads playing in the back. The ads don’t stop though.

When you are downloading audio files check out the ways you can you can convert the audio files into the formats you prefer.

Lossless File Formats

Image by Groume http://bit.ly/1J5ORGH
Image by Groume http://bit.ly/1J5ORGH

It does not matter if you are making use of music, images, or plain video files; everyone needs to understand what various types of formats are and how to use them. By this we mean, by using the right format, you can retain a file’s audio and visual quality without making it too big in size.

Many people prefer to make use of lossless music files. Lossless are the files that reproduce exactly what you have on CD without any loss in quality. It can also offer its users high resolution with sample rates superior to that of CD.

One of the major benefits of lossless files is that when it is decompressed, it becomes a replica of digital downloads or CD. Once you rip a CD to lossless and play it back on any software you desire the file will be converted into the exact same digital stream as was on the original CD.

What Is the Difference between Lossy and Lossless Formats

RAW format is what we refer to as Lossless format because it preserves the file’s original data. While you may call JPEG lossy format as some data is always lost when we covert it to JPEG format. Here are some more examples of the lossy and lossless formats.

  • Images in GIF and JPEG formats are lossy, while PNG, BMP and Raw are lossless formats for images.
  • Audio files in OGG, MP4 and MP3 are lossy formats, while files in ALAC, FLAC and WAV are all lossless.

Some lossless formats also offer compression. For instance, WAV is entirely uncompressed but takes up a lot of space. ALAC and FLAC are lossless audio files that have the same data as the WAV file. These files use a type of compression to make smaller sized files. These two formats also retain all the data while compressing. But these are still bigger than the MP3 files. MP3 files omit a lot of data.

Should Lossy Be Converted To Lossless

Now it makes sense that we only right the digital wrongs, and convert back all our lossy audio files back to lossless, but unfortunately, it does not work that way. When you rip from an audio CD to an MP3 file, which is a lossy format, you lose a lot of data. Now when you convert it to, say, a lossless format like FLAC, you are only getting a bigger sized file and none of the data is lost. The new audio file will be just as good as the MP3 file is.

Now it is also a bad idea to convert lossy files into other types of lossy files. More data is thrown away. It is like taking a photocopy of a photocopy, as none of the copies are as good as the original.

But if you plan on converting the lossless formats to lossy directly, then that could work well for you. If you rip an audio CD to FLAC, you will end up with a file that is just as good as the CD.

Song Conversion 101

Image by Todd http://bit.ly/1Sa99jJ
Image by Todd http://bit.ly/1Sa99jJ

You may think that there is not much to converting an audio file that you downloaded from iTunes. It is true that it’s simple, but did anyone ever tell you the mechanics behind it all. Here is how you can convert a song from iTunes to a different file format and keep a copy of the original intact.

When you are converting files from a compressed format to an uncompressed one, for example converting an MP3 file to an AIFF one, the sound quality will remain the same. But if you are converting between two compressed files, then you will easily notice the sound quality has gone down.

Now the solution to this is that for best results, you might want to import the original audio file using a different encoding method.

To convert the format, you need to follow the steps given below:

  1. Go to iTunes Preferences. If you are using Windows, you might have to select edit first and then click on Preferences.
  2. Click on the General button and then select Importing Settings.
  3. From here, you will see the Import Using menu as a pop up. Choose the encoding format you desire and click OK.
  4. Next, choose the songs from your library and move on to File and from there Create New Version. The menu will show options for: MP3, AAC, AIFF, WAV and Apple Lossless.

If there are some songs that you have not imported to iTunes yet, you can do that now, and after that convert them then and there. Based on your preferences, a converted copy will be made of the file in the iTunes library. If you want to convert all the songs in the library then hold the Option key if you are using Mac or the Shift key if you are using Windows, and select File, then Create New Version, and then click on Convert. The Import preference setting will easily match what you chose in step number 3.

iTunes will automatically ask you for the location of the folder you want to import and have it converted. And viola all the songs will be converted just like that.

Compressed Data

When you are converting a song, some of the data can be lost because of the way some formats compress it. Because of this reason, sometimes the formats are called ‘lossy’ formats. There is a benefit of using such formats; the file sizes are always a lot smaller which means you can always store a lot more songs in the same amount of disk space. The downside of this is that the sound quality will not be what you expect it to be, that is the quality you heard from the compressed file. That being said, if you are using a really good pair of headphones or speakers, you might not be able to tell the difference at all.

Remember, once you compress a song file, (that is forcefully let go of some of its data) you will not receive that lost data back by uncompressing it.